Biblipeacay

The formative role of gendered cultural expectations in the everyday lives of American women from the mid-nineteenth century onward is hardly a subject of scholarly debate today. Numerous historical and theoretical investigations of the formations and agencies of womanhood, and manhood for that matter, in the United States have demonstrated the centrality of gender in the construction and negotiation of cultural meanings and material relations.

For women, cultural expectations of gender often focused on domestic roles and responsibilities and notions of femininity. An established weft of the social fabric of American culture by the turn of the twentieth century, prescriptions regarding female behavior and appearance were tethered to such gendered beliefs. In this period women were inundated with domestic advice in newspaper columns, magazines, etiquette manuals, and advertisements about how to be better mothers, cooks, hostesses, housekeepers, decorators, and consumers. However, one subset of this advice literature that cut across spheres, private and public, young and old, single and married, was beauty.

Like gender, feminine beauty was and is a social and cultural construction, long considered a primary constituent of female identity. In addition to hair dyes, powders, rouge, lipstick, and other cosmetic aids, electric lighting, the subject of this study, was among the many tools promoted for enhancing feminine beauty.

As a culturally constructed aspect of identity, beauty also implicated other related social beliefs and practices, including those constituting race and class. The intersection of dominant notions of race, class, and gender is apparent in the strategic development of the market for electricity in the first half of the twentieth century.

'Threats and Promises: The Marketing and Promotion of Electric Lighting to Women in the United States, 1880s-1960s' by Margaret Maile Petty IN: Vol. 21 No. 1 / Spring-Summer 2014 print edition of West 86th. [via @W86th]

*Loaded Guns* post on Angela Voulangas’ blog, (what is this?), featuring extraordinarily detailed firearm engraving by Otto Carter

smithsonianlibraries:

Royale with cheese??
Image of “Haematornis holospilus” (possibly Spilornis holospilus the Philippine serpent eagle) from “Zoologia typica" (1849)

smithsonianlibraries:

Royale with cheese??

Image of “Haematornis holospilus” (possibly Spilornis holospilus the Philippine serpent eagle) from “Zoologia typica" (1849)

Musicomania (1946-1947) from the small USCB collection of Vogue picture records LINK

Musicomania (1946-1947) from the small USCB collection of Vogue picture records LINK

bookpatrol:

Take Poems Once a Day and call me in the morning: Deborah Alma - Emergency Poet

Meet Deborah Alma the Emergency Poet and mastermind of ”the world’s first and only mobile poetic first aid service.”

Dressed in white coat and stethoscope, Emergency Poet travels the UK in her 1970’s ambulance, accompanied by Nurse Verse or The Poemedic. Her domain -  literary and music festivals, libraries, schools, pubs, weddings and conferences… “anywhere where poetic help may be urgently required…”

Emergency Poet offers consultations inside her ambulance and prescribes poems as cures. In the waiting room under an attached awning Nurse Verse dispenses poemcetamols and other poetic pills and treatments from the Cold Comfort Pharmacy.

Perhaps the folks at Wave Books can trade in their Poetry Bus for a fleet of these beauties to traverse the country during National Poetry Month!

universitybookstore:

Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month, a beautiful new book from the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum and University of Texas Press, Miguel Covarrubias: Drawing a Cosmopolitan Life. José Miguel Covarrubias Duclaud (1904 - 1957) was a Mexican painter and caricaturist, ethnologist and art historian.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miguel_Covarrubias

http://www.americanartarchives.com/covarrubias.htm

kacper-kiec:

Dystopia

kacper-kiec:

Dystopia

michaelmoonsbookshop:

Ritual of FreeMasonry

19th century edition c1870

Quarantena series by Robert Scott Gilson on bdif from 50watts

Title: Sebald, the Rings of Saturn

capricedubibliophile:

Art nouveau/Art déco bookbinding by Henri Noulhac (1866-1931)

capricedubibliophile:

Art nouveau/Art déco bookbinding by Henri Noulhac (1866-1931)